next product
search
Home > Apothecary Supplies > Aromatic Extracts > Absolutes >

ANGELICA ROOT ABSOLUTE


ANGELICA ROOT ABSOLUTE
quantity in basket: none
code: 15325

quantity:

Latin Binomial: Angelica archangelica
Plant Part: Root
Extraction: Absolute
Growing Practice: Ethical
Country of Origin: China
Odor Type: WOODY

ANGELICA ROOT ABSOLUTE

Odor characteristic: Pungent, heady, fatty, liqueur odor with a fruitiness and very slight peppery aspect. Arctander describes the odor as intensely musky-woody, heavy, sweet and spicy and with a richness similar to Ambrette seed absolute, but with more earthy, root-like notes. The steam distilled essential oil from Angelica root imparts more topnote effects than the absolute. Dryout is tobaccoey, fatty, spicy/cumin-like. The root absolute will have a pronounced fatty note as compared to the oily note of the seed.

Refractive Index: 1.46900 to 1.47800 @ 20.00 °C.
Specific Gravity: 0.890 to 0.983 @ 20 °C
Appearance: amber to dark yellow, with medium viscosity
BioChemical Class: Monoterpene
BioChemicals: Monoterpenes: (approx 70%)α- & β- pinenes, (24 & >1.5%), limonene estersup to 2%): bornyl and transverbenyl acetate: terpenic alkaloids: nitro-menthadenes; furo-coumarins: (about 24%) umbelliferone, archangelicin, angelicin, bergaptene, osthol

Liguistilide content: 45% min 46%
CAS No: 8015-64-3
INCI Name: ANGELICA ARCHANGELICA ROOT OIL

About the Plant

Angelica archangelica is a biennial Umbelliferae plant, hardy to zone 4, not frost tender. Europe's main angelica producing regions are Belgium, France and Germany. Angelica possesses thick, fleshy taproots with many shootlets attached and develops a hollow, round, jointed, channeled, smooth, purplish stem that divides into many branches that can grow to 5 or 6 ft. in height. The leaves are dark green, divided into three parts, each of which is again divided into three serrated leaflets, sometimes lobed. The lower leaves are larger sometimes 2 feet wide. The entire plant is aromatic. The scented flowers are hermaphrodite (having both male and female organs), pollinated by insects. Angelica requires rich, moist soil and grows best in a semi-shade light woodland area. Readily propagated by root division set out in either fall or spring. Thrives best if the soil is frequently cultivated.

History

One ancient legend has it that Angelica archangelica was revealed by an angel in a dream to a monk to cure the plague . . .hence the name, Angelica or archangel. Angelica was held in such esteem that it was called, "The root of the holy ghost." American Indian tribes also used the infused or macerated roots to remove evil spirits.

Paracelsus (1493-1541), an alchemist and physician, during the plague epidemic of 1510 in Milan, referred to Angelica as a 'marvelous medicine' for treating the illness. Paracelsus, born Phillip von Hohenheim, took the name Paracelsus (meaning "equal to or greater than Celsus") in what would appear to be a claim that his expertise and knowledge exceeded that of the Roman from the 1st Century known for his tract on medicine.

Gerard, author of Herball or Historie of Plants(1597), a work that borrows its information liberally from Dr. Priest's earlier work Pemptades (1583), claimed, "If you doe but take a piece of the roote and holde it in your mouth, or chew the same between your teeth it doth most certainly drive away the pestilentiall aire, yea although the corrupt aire have possesses the hart, yet it driveth it out again." Pestilentiall aire? It is thought that reference relates to Angelica's use for the relief of flatulence.

Aromatherapy: Angelica root/seed steam distilled essential oil is preferred in aromatherapy.

Perfumery: Angelica root absolute is preferred in perfumery in heavy chypres, oriental bases, fougeres and citrus colognes. It imparts a pungent, heady, fatty, liqueur odor with a fruitiness and very slight peppery aspect. Arctander describes the odor as intensely musky-woody, heavy, sweet and spicy and with a richness similar to Ambrette seed absolute, but with more earthy, root-like notes. The steam distilled essential oil from Angelica root imparts more topnote effects than the absolute. Dryout is tobaccoey, fatty, spicy/cumin-like. The root absolute will have a pronounced fatty note as compared to the oily note of the seed. Used in perfumery for its unusual tenacity and peculiar animal note, and rich, full body. Angelica root absolute blends well with aniseed, bergamot, clary sage, cardamom, eucalyptus, lemongrass, lemon, lavender, juniper, pine, rosemary, sandalwood and vetiver.

Angelica root absolute, like its steam-distilled counterpart, is phototoxic and not recommended for skin application if exposure to sunlight is expected within 24 hours of application. Extreme photosensitization occurs if the skin is exposed to sunlight or UV light following application of the root oil (diluted) to the skin. New IFRA (International Fragrance Association) regulations mandate that natural extracts containing furocoumarin-like substances may be used in cosmetic products provided that the total concentration of furocoumarin-like substances in the finished cosmetic product do not exceed 1 ppm (parts-per-million). These extracts include angelica root oil (steam distilled and absolute), bergamot oil and all citrus-expressed oils. Because of its traditional herbal use to induce menstruation, it would be prudent for pregnant women to avoid using either the absolute or essential oil.

The information provided on these pages is not a substitute for necessary medical care, nor intended as medical advice. Always keep aromatic extracts tightly closed and in a cool, dark place, out of reach of children. Never ingest aromatic extracts. Always dilute aromatic extracts when applying topically and avoid areas around eyes or mucous membranes. If redness or irritation occurs, stop using immediately and contact your health provider if necessary.