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Extracts, Alcohols, Tinctures

Note: Discounts do not apply to Samples.

These products include "tinctures" extracted from natural herbal plant materials using alcohol.

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Code Name Size/Price  
12132 Vanilla Fluid Extract
size :
12371 BUTTERFLY BUSH FLOWER TINCTURE
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12344 MOCK ORANGE FLOWER TINCTURE
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12333 ROCK HYRAX TINCTURE
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12370 SKUNK CABBAGE TINCTURE
size :
16501 Calma Synergy
size :
71605705 ScarsVanish
$30.00
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Note: Discounts do not apply to Samples.

These products include "tinctures" extracted from natural herbal plant materials using alcohol. Alcohol Tincturing

With the re-emergence of natural perfumery, hobbyists and artisan perfumers are creating small amounts of aromatic perfume materials (especially those that cannot be obtained by steam distillation and may not be commercially available) by tincturing in high quality perfumers alcohol (ethanol). Note: this is NOT denatured alcohol. This process is somewhat similar to maceration (See Infused Oils), and fresh aromatic material is placed into 190-200 proof alcohol in a lidded glass vessel. The vessel is agitated daily and plant material is removed as it is 'spent', indicated by lack of color and depleted, limp appearance. Leaving the plant material in the alcohol too long will ruin the odor as the plant material decomposes. To increase the fragrance strength of the tincture, plant material is removed and replaced over and over again with fresh material, much like as is done in enfleurage (below). With some materials, it is useful to use the washing technique obtained with a Soxhlet. It is sometimes necessary to refrigerate or freeze the filtered alcohol from season to season to keep increasing the fragrance intensity with a succession of fresh flowers. This is the only way to obtain true natural fragrance of flowers such as Lilac and Buddleia. Natural perfumers are now experimenting with aromatic materials from goat hair to lichens and moss, and various wild mushrooms.